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Lil Peep has gotten used to people hating him. Facetiming from a couch in his Los Angeles apartment, the 20-year-old songwriter made an observation that’ll seem obvious to anyone who has encountered his slurry amalgam of mopey vocals and rim-rattling 808s. He let his freshly re-dyed black hair hang in front of his phone camera, temporarily obscuring the tattoo that screams “CRYBABY” across his right eyebrow. “I’m very… controversial for some reason,” he said, with at least some amount of glee.

Peep was born as Gustav Åhr on Long Island, in “the shittiest fucking suburbs ever.” As with many creative misfits from non-cities, he didn’t really get along with many people. “They were like the stereotypical high schoolers from the movies,” he explained. “It’s hard to find people you fuck with.” He spent a lot of time alone, and finished school in a low-pressure online program that required only a single essay a week, which he said his mom usually ended up writing for him.

Since he either hated (or was hated by) most of the kids he knew personally, Peep spent his teenage years holed up in his room, taking comfort in rap and punk records before eventually developing a fascination with weirder internet-based acts. All the while, he battled periods of depression and suicidal thoughts, vaguely defined darknesses that he still confronts in his life and music. “I was completely alone,” he said of his younger years. “Being suicidal is a weird feeling. You get really reckless. And then in moments where I came really close to doing something stupid, I would go to music for help.” He had the internet to rely on, though; it’s how he first got involved with the underground rap circuit he orbits today. He said it actually saved his life.

Read the full article via The Fader HERE and get tickets to catch him LIVE Sunday May 7th HERE.

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By: Molly Randhawa

For most young people, figuring out what you want to do with the rest of your life can be a daunting task. For producer Sam Gellaitry, however, making the decision to drop out of school at age 16 to focus on music was natural for the young star. At age 17, his actions were reaffirmed when he signed to L.A.-based record label Soulection. Now, three years later, the producer has signed to his dream label at XL Recordings and is crafting music that beautifully orchestrates the cinematic sounds of his daily life.

The last time the Scottish-born artist stopped in Vancouver was in October of last year opening for the Glass Animals’ “How to be a Human Being” tour where he played a set of all his own music. “[It was] very refreshing. It felt like a milestone because I never used to play much of my own music in DJ sets,” the young artist shares. “The fact that I can travel playing my own music really strengthens my self-belief in producing and makes my music stronger.”

Having just released the conclusive third EP from his Escapism trilogy, Gellaitry has a lot to take in over his worldwide tour promoting the new record. With an eye for capturing sounds through an objective lens and, quite literally, a camera lens, he encourages his fans to take a peek into the sounds that he composes through photography. “It’s a great way of capturing atmosphere and surroundings which [in turn] inspire the music I make,” he explains. “I like the contrast between photography and production because it’s capturing something in the best way possible rather than creating something completely new and different.”

Gellaitry pushes the sound in his new album through enigmatic imagery, intricately detailing the vivid sounds of his surroundings. He shares how each of the songs off of his new EP has its own picture to paint. “[My sound is] very hard to pinpoint to a specific genre. I just call it ‘electronic,’” explains Gellaitry. With tracks like “Jungle Waters” being inspired by film scores and “Acres” being inspired by his hometown, Escapism III showcases the diversity within the young musician’s sound.

0415Sam2

Sam Gellaitry performs at Fortune Sound Club on Sunday, April 15th as part of Seasons Festival. Tickets are available for $20 in advance.

Originally published on BeatRoute Magazine.

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By: Jamie Goyman

Having graced the sound systems of numerous clubs, lofts and warehouses around the world with his music, the now Toronto-based Jacques Greene, known by his friends as Philip Aubin-Dionne, has finally released his first full-length album, Infinite, and it’s fucking phenomenal. “I think a lot of art and culture needs to be extravagant or extreme [towards] whichever direction you want to get people to,” says Aubin-Dionne. “If you’re trying to make people feel sexy there are R&B songs that are almost pornographic, about fucking, but you [actually just] want to make people get close and grind. It’s almost a caricature of the mood.”

The LP itself, chock-full of earnest and melodramatic emotions, not only tunes fans into where Aubin-Dionne is headed musically, but also displays the talent it takes to connect listeners to his entire body of work in just one album. “It’s sort of an exciting and scary time because the album is sort of a manifesto of the Jacques Greene sound up until this point, a sort of celebration of all those EPs,” he says. “With that comes the need to switch it up. I’ll have a bit of time in studio between a couple festival things and hopefully be able to do that. To just keep it going, really.”

Spending the past five years teasing fans with EPs and singles, it would seem that the album took longer than five or six weeks during the summer of 2015 for Aubin-Dionne to get the album’s 11 tracks ready for mastering. “Feel Infinite,” the second track on the album, sets a precedent for the remainder of the LP, closing out with the artist’s own favourite track, “You Can See All My Light.” “Even to this day when I play it gets me in my feelings and resonates a lot,” says Aubin-Dionne.

The only intentional vocal feature that happens on the album is with How To Dress Well, who is artistically very much on the same level as Green. “I really like the guy and we have very similar ideas as far as our intersections with pop music. He’s a pretty smart guy and it’s always fun to pick his brain,” explains Aubin-Dionne. “When it came time to make this record I didn’t want a producer album that was full of random ‘features.’ It also made so much sense to call upon a really good friend and someone I trusted to work with how I wanted this record to be.” Infinite came from an honest place and when something is created in absolute purity, it can’t be tarnished.

Deciding to bring half his studio with him on tour, Aubin-Dionne has been working on a responsive light setup to work alongside customized projections with friends from Montreal: Melissa Matos, Adam Hummell, Shadi Assadi and Emmanuel Rinfret. “It’s the first time I’m going on tour with a full body of work, but the way I perform it’s going to be a little different every night,” he says. “A bunch of the synths [I have] can’t save pre-set sounds so I have to make it up as I go along. I want it to be sort of like a show that needs to work out the ebbs and flows.”

Jacques Greene

Jacques Greene performs live at Fortune Sound Club on Sunday, April 9th. Tickets are available for $15 in advance.

Originally published on BeatRoute Magazine.

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